Ask Singapore Homework?

Upload a photo of a Singapore homework and someone will email you the solution for free.



Question

secondary 3 | A Maths
2 Answers Below

Anyone can contribute an answer, even non-tutors.

Answer This Question
Chelsia
Chelsia

secondary 3 chevron_right A Maths chevron_right Singapore

i dont to do do and sketch the graph

Date Posted: 2 months ago
Views: 16
Eric Nicholas K
Eric Nicholas K
2 months ago
Hi Chelsia! For graph of y = x^2/3, the shape of the graph looks much like the graph of y = ln x except that the graph starts from the origin (0, 0).

For the graph of y = -x^2/3, we just reflect that graph along the x-axis.

See 2 Answers

done {{ upvoteCount }} Upvotes
clear {{ downvoteCount * -1 }} Downvotes
Eric Nicholas K
Eric Nicholas K's answer
2994 answers (Tutor Details)
1st
Hi Chelsia! Here is the graph. In this topic you must memorise three different cases of graphs (on top of the ones you learn in E Maths) for cases where the coefficient of x is positive. For negative coefficients of x (as the case is, in this question), we reflect the graph along the x-axis.
done {{ upvoteCount }} Upvotes
clear {{ downvoteCount * -1 }} Downvotes
Eric Nicholas K
Eric Nicholas K's answer
2994 answers (Tutor Details)
Here are the general shapes of the graphs for positive coefficients of x.

If the power of x is 1, the graph is linear (this is in E Maths, but I put this for comparison purposes).

If the power of x is more than 1, the graph starts slow first but then suddenly curves upwards very quickly. This is because as x increases, y increases rapidly (think of y = x2).

Similar logic applies for power of x from 0 to 1. The graph starts moderately fast at first but then slows down. This is because as x increases, y no longer increases by much.

For the last case where the power of x is negative, the graph goes down in the manner I have drawn. This is because as x increases, y decreases, yet the value of y can never be negative. As x increases, t decreases but the rate of decrease slows down (think of y = 1/x from E Maths).

Let me know if you need more explanation on this and I will do my best to explain again.